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Sheppard in Photos

Sheppard

Instructors from the 366th Training Squadron construction electrician course give guidance to students learning pole-top rescue concepts at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 5, 2018. The seven block course has extensive safety training for emergencies such as heat related injury, fallen gaffs and wounds caused by gaffs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Madeleine E. Remillard)

Sheppard

Sailors from the 366th Training Squadron construction electrician course perform pole-top rescue procedures at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 5, 2018. The seven-block course has extensive safety training for emergencies such as heat-related injury, fallen gaffs and wounds cause by gaffs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Madeleine E. Remillard)

Sheppard

Tech. Sgt. Thomas Schill, 361st Training Squadron egress course instructor, gives guidance to his class of Airmen as they learn to set up and break down maintenance stands at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 5, 2018. Schill’s class graduated Sept. 7, 2018. After four years as an instructor here, Schill said he is excited to continue his career at Luke AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Madeleine E. Remillard)

Sheppard

Airman Wendell Campbell, 361st Training Squadron egress course student, sets up a maintenance stand as part of a progress check at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 5, 2018. Maintenance stands make it easier to reach ejection seats to perform inspections. Campbell, an Arizona native, graduated Sept. 7, 2018. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Madeleine E. Remillard)

Sheppard

Sailors from the 366th Training Squadron construction electrician course perform pole-top rescue procedures at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 5, 2018. The seven-block course has extensive safety training for emergencies such as heat-related injury, fallen gaffs and wounds cause by gaffs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Madeleine E. Remillard)

Metals Tech. instructor demonstrates welding to students.

Master Sgt. James Mattingly, 361st Training Squadron aircrafts metals technology instructor, screws together some basic metals at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 9, 2018. Before seeing his class graduate the next week, Mattingly wanted to perform a demonstration one last time before they go into the operational Air Force and work on real parts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Metals Tech. instructor demonstrates welding to students.

Master Sgt. James Mattingly, sitting, 361st Training Squadron aircrafts metals technology instructor, performs a demonstration for his students at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Sept. 5, 2018. Mattingly is performing a Tungsten Inert Gas Welding demo, which is done by heating up a thin piece of Tungsten which Mattingly uses as some sort of flaming pencil to write/weld patterns onto the pieces of metal. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Metals Tech. instructor demonstrates welding to students.

Master Sgt. James Mattingly, welding, 361st Training Squadron aircrafts metals technology instructor, performs a demonstration for his class at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Aug. 5, 2018. During their training Airmen only work on raw metals that won't be used other than to test their welding, but once at their first base they will create parts to be used in actual aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Metals Tech. instructor demonstrates welding to students.

Master Sgt. James Mattingly, 361st Training Squadron aircrafts metals technology instructor, welds together two pieces of metal at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Aug. 5, 2018. Mattingly is using a technique called GMAW (gas metal arc welding) originally known as MIG welding. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Metals Tech. instructor demonstrates welding to students.
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Master Sgt. James Mattingly, 361st Training Squadron aircrafts metals technology instructor, welds together two pieces of metal at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Aug. 5, 2018. Mattingly is using a technique called GMAW (gas metal arc welding). GMAW is the most common welding process and with proper training Airmen in training in this field learn how to weld in just a few weeks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

SHEPPARD AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- Metal, wood and sweat. See behind the scenes of the specific trainings that happen here at Sheppard Air Force Base.