HomeNewsArticle Display

Sheppard in Photos

Sheppard Air Force Base Airman works on an engine

Airman Zachary McGlone, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course student, works on an aircraft engine at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 3, 2018. McGlone said his type of process is slow and steady. A self-proclaimed perfectionist, he makes sure he does not have to do the same thing twice and usually results in him being the last in his class to finish his tasks. This is McGlone's last time working on this training engine as he is set to graduate by the end of this week. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Air Force Base Airman works on an engine

Airman Zachary McGlone, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course student, works on an aircraft engine at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 3, 2018. McGlone is tightening all the safety wires that secure the parts inside the engine. Multiple safety wires, some in hard to reach spots deep in the engine, must be secured correctly or the parts may become loose while the aircraft is in flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Electrical and environmental systems apprentice course Airmen replace components on an F-15 Eagle.

Airman Joseph Rhym, left, reads instructions to Airman Jack Gagnon, 364th Training Squadron electrical and environmental apprentice course students, as they work on an F-15 Eagle at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 5, 2018. Gagnon and Rhym are working on removing and installing an oxygen regulator in the flightdeck of the aircraft. E&E systems technicians are responsible for several components in almost every aircraft in the Air Force, excluding the newer F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Air Force Base Airman works on an engine

Airman Porter McCullough, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course student, works on a training engine at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 4, 2018. McCullough is torquing the fuel nozzle and manifold of the F100 engine. This process is important because the nozzle and manifold is responsible for delivering fuel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Electrical and environmental systems apprentice course Airmen replace components on an F-15 Eagle.

Airman Adrihn Tenakoun, left, and Airman Alex Walker, 364th Training Squadron electrical and environmental systems apprentice course students, work on an F-15 Eagle at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 5, 2018. Tenakoun and Walker are removing and installing a bleeder check valve as part of their training at Sheppard. Tenakoun and Walker graduate soon and according to Walker, "are the fastest team in the 364th." (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Air Force Base Airman works on an engine

From left, Airman Taelor Sievers, Airman Cody Corn, Airman 1st Class Daniel Stebens and Airman 1st Class Hannah Cantrell, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course students, work on a F100 engine's fuel nozzle and manifold at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 4, 2018. The students are torquing the fuel nozzle and manifold to ensure fuel is delivered properly. The F100 engine is usually used in F-15s and F-16s. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Electrical and environmental systems apprentice course Airmen replace components on an F-15 Eagle.

Airman Adrihn Tenakoun, left, and Airman Alex Walker, 364th Training Squadron electrical and environmental systems apprentice course students, work on an F-15 Eagle at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 5, 2018. Tenakoun and Walker are removing and installing a bleeder check valve as part of their training at Sheppard. The E&E training consists of students removing and replacing several components around the aircraft multiple times until they are proficient in each. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Electrical and environmental systems apprentice course Airmen replace components on an F-15 Eagle.

Airman Joseph Rhym, left, reads instructions to Airman Jack Gagnon, 364th Training Squadron electrical and environmental apprentice course students, as they work on an F-15 Eagle at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 5, 2018. Gagnon and Rhym are working on removing and installing an oxygen regulator in the flightdeck of the aircraft. E&E systems technicians are responsible for several components in almost every aircraft in the Air Force, excluding the newer F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Electrical and environmental systems apprentice course Airmen replace components on an F-15 Eagle.

Airman Jack Gagnon reads instructions to Airman Joseph Rhym, 364th Training Squadron electrical and environmental systems apprentice course students, as they work in the flight deck of an F-15 Eagle at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 5, 2018. Gagnon and Rhym are working on replacing an oxygen regulator. For training, they will remove and replace the component multiple times in the week, but on the operational side the regulator is usually replaced every six months. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Air Force Base is visited by Maj. Gen. Timothy Leahy, Commander of the 2nd Air Force
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 11

Major General Timothy Leahy, 2nd Air Force Commander, points to where Airmen using augmented reality should look during a visit to Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 3, 2018. Leahy visited Sheppard's digital design lab to check on the progress of integrating augmented reality and virtual reality into their training. Leahy has visited before and has stated augmented reality is a tool that could enhance training in the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Air Force Base is visited by Maj. Gen. Timothy Leahy, Commander of the 2nd Air Force
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 11

Maj. Gen. Timothy Leahy, 2nd Air Force Commander, shares a laugh with senior leadership during a briefing at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Oct. 3, 2018. Leahy attended an innovation brief to hear about the different technologies the wing is hoping to use in the future. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

SHEPPARD AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- Electrical and environmental systems, aerospace propulsion and a visit from the commander of the 2nd Air Force. Training, inspiring and developing never stops at Sheppard.