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Sheppard Airmen work on trainer jets

362nd Training Squadron B-52 crew chief apprentice course students work on a B-52 Stratofortress at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 19, 2018. The students are working on installing a drag chute on the B-52, which slows the aircraft on aborted takeoffs. The students have only recently got to Sheppard last week and are already getting hands on experience. The curriculum at Sheppard relies on visual training aids, lectures and primarily hands on training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen work on trainer jets

Airman Daniel Dumich, left, and Airman 1st Class Dalton Peacock, 362nd Training Squadron B-52 crew chief apprentice course students, install a drag chute on a B-52 Stratofortress at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 19, 2018. The drag chute is used to slow the aircraft during aborted takeoffs. The students must also be careful not to activate the chute while installing it, to avoid a 43 foot in diameter chute blasting at them while up on the scaffolding. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen work on trainer jets

From left, Airman Owen Denue, Airman 1st Class Dalton Peacock and Airman Domicic Sticha, 362nd Training Squadron B-52 crew chief apprentice course students, install a drag chute onto a B-52 Stratofortress at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 19, 2018. These students started technical training a week ago and are already getting hands on experience. Bases that support the B-52 are few though and the students will either go to Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, or Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen work on trainer jets

Airman 1st Class Dalton Peacock, left, and Airman Daniel Dumich, 362nd Training Suqadron B-52 crew chief apprentice course students, install a drag chute onto a B-52 Stratofortress at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 19, 2018. Dumich and Peacock have already secured the drag chute and now Peacock is lowering the door while Dumich holds his thumb out to indicate when to stop. The students must leave an opening because they will have one more step to complete before the drag chute is good for flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen work on trainer jets

362nd Training Squadron B-52 crew chief apprentice course students watch as a drag chute deploys out of a B-52 Stratofortress at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 19, 2018. The drag chute is appromixmately 43 feet in diameter. The students are told constatly to never put any limbs over the drag chute's panel door as the force when it opens could cause an injury. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen in training work on a C-130 Hercules trainer jet.

362nd Training Squadron C-130 crew chief apprentice course students close the cargo door of an C-130 Hercules at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 20, 2018. The C-130 has two modes of opening the door, manuel and automatic. In an emergeny situation, when the hyrdaulic pumps or electrical systems don't function correctly, crew chiefs will have to open and close the door manually, which is what the students are practicing now. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen in training work on a C-130 Hercules trainer jet.

362nd Training Squadron C-130 crew chief apprentice course students open the cargo door of an C-130 Hercules at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 20, 2018. The Airmen are working on opening the door manually, which is only used during emergency situations. Each time the Airmen pull the lever on the side, it is releasing 300 psi, which slowly opens the giant door. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen in training work on a C-130 Hercules trainer jet.

363rd Training Squadron armament apprentice course students secure a bomb cradle to a MHU-83 bomb loader at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 20, 2018. The MHU-83 is able to carry 7,000 pounds and is equipped with side wheels to make slight adjustments when lifting the bomb to the bomb rack. It is very important to align the bomb correctly so it takes a very skilled driver and using the side wheels for slight adjustments is a big help. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen in training work on a C-130 Hercules trainer jet.

A 363rd Training Squadron armament apprentice course student uses a MHU-83 bomb loader to transport training bombs at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 20, 2018. The training bombs used at Sheppard are not the exact same as the live bombs that will be used at their operational bases, but it helps condition the trainee's minds to get more comfortable around the idea of carrying something very delicate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen in training work on a C-130 Hercules trainer jet.
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363rd Training Squadron armaments apprentice course students watch as their wingmen load bombs onto a MC-130 Combat Shadow trainer at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 20, 2018. This part of the course was implemented into the armamnets course May 2018, making this batch of Airmen the sixth class to graduate with this extra training before going to their first base. To read more about the implementation go to this link: https://www.sheppard.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1615904/c-130-with-rich-heritage-enhances-training-and-readiness/ (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard Airmen in training work on a C-130 Hercules trainer jet.
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363rd Training Squadron armament apprentice course students load bombs at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Nov. 20, 2018. To ensure the bomb is correctly aligned, two sets of eyes are set up to see the horizontal and the vertical angle of the bomb rack. Each one communicates with the driver of the lift to make slight adjustments. In a usual operation, there will only be about three Airmen working to load a bomb. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

SHEPPARD AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- Bring in the big guns! I'm talking 'bout the B-52 Stratofortresses and C-130 Herculi? Herculeses? Point is, meet the men and women who maintain and arm these giant physic-defying titans of the air.