HomeNewsArticle Display

Sheppard in Photos

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training

2nd Lt. Glenn Colby, Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program student pilot, trains to take off in a T-6A Texan II in a Operational Flight Training simulator at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. The OFT can be used for multiple simulations as it has both the flightdeck simulator and a 360-degree field of view. It is also made in a way that tricks the users brain to make them feel as if they are actually turning, going up, etc.. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training

2nd Lt. Glenn Colby, Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training Program student pilot, trains to take off in a T-6A Texan II in an Operational Flight Training simulator while instructor Scott Davison overlooks at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. Davison also acts as the flight tower controller, giving Colby a complete simulation from getting into the flightdeck, getting signals from a crew chief, waiting for other flights to land, to him giving the go ahead for take off. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training

2nd Lt. Glenn Colby, Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program student pilot, gives a hand signal during an Operational Flight Training simulation at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. Colby is simulating a take off, but that includes all the safety measures like communicating with the crew chief on the ground, taxiing before flight and communicating with the control tower to know when it is clear. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training

2nd Lt. Glenn Colby, Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program student pilot, simulates taking off in an Operational Flight Trainer at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. Each profile details what the pilot has for training that day. Different training requires different simulators though. It can range from learning the switches in the flight-deck to landing. The OFT is the best simulator to use for taking off and landing simulations as it has an almost complete 360-degree field of view for the pilot to get immersed in. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training

2nd Lt. Glenn Colby, Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program student pilot, simulates taking off in an Operational Flight Trainer at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. Colby will ahve to get familiar with the instrument panel, controls, levers, taxiing, take offs, landings and basic flying in the multi-million dollar simulators before stepping into an actual aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training

2nd Lt. Glenn Colby, Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training Program student pilot, trains to take off in a T-6A Texan II in an Operational Flight Training simulator at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. The OFT allows student pilots to get the most experience flying while not actually flying. All the controls simulate the same things they would do in real life and the OFT is made to where the pilot will actually feel like he is in the air when turning and likewise actions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training

2nd Lt. Glenn Colby, Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program student pilot, trains in an Operational Flight Training simulator at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. The OFT is one of Sheppard's most important assets. As it is priced at around $5 to $6 million, the simulator allows pilots to do similar activities they could in a real plane and is built in a way that tricks your brain to make you feel like you are actually going up, down or in a spiral. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Navy constructionman recruits train at Sheppard AFB

366th Training Squadron Navy detachment constructionman recruits use their shovels to clean off a drill at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 19, 2018. The recruits are drilling holes to put up new power poles up that will be used for climbing by the same recruits that put them up and others until they will need to be changed again. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Navy constructionman recruits train at Sheppard AFB

A 366th Training Squadron Navy detachment constructionman recruit cleans off a drill with a shovel at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 18, 2018. This recruit is helping to put up new poles they will use later on in their training. Poles can vary on how long they can be used depending on what kind of wood was used. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Navy constructionman recruits train at Sheppard AFB
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 15

A 366th Training Squadron Navy detachment contructionman recruit builds a bleacher at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 18, 2018. The recruits are building the bleachers so when summer rolls around, they will have a place to sit in the shade to reduce chances of heat stroke as Texas weather in the summer could reach temperatures of over 100 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Navy constructionman recruits train at Sheppard AFB
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 15

A 366th Training Squadron Navy detachment constructionman recruit builds a bleacher with her fellow recruits at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 19, 2018. The students are building bleachers to use during the summertime to sit in the shade out of the blazing Texas weather, reducing the chances of heat stroke during their training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Navy constructionman recruits train at Sheppard AFB
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 15

366th Training Squadron Navy detachment contructionman recruits build a bleacher at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 18, 2018. The recruits are building the bleachers for themselves as when summer rolls around, they will have a place to sit in the shade to reduce chances of heat stroke as Texas weather in the summer could reach temperatures of over 100 degrees. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Navy constructionman recruits train at Sheppard AFB
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 13 of 15

A 366th Training Squadron Navy detachment constructionman instructor waits for a recruit to remove excess dirt from a drill at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 18, 2018. They are drilling holes to replace old telephone poles used by previous classes. The poles are damaged by the sheer amount of climbing that happens during the constructionman training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Navy constructionman recruits train at Sheppard AFB
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 14 of 15

366th Training Squadron Navy detachment constructionman recruits wait for a drill to retract at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 19, 2018. These recruits are drilling holes to put up new power poles. Once up, the poles will be used for climbing later on in their training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Sheppard AFB ENJJPT Simulator Pilot Training
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 15 of 15

An Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program student pilot works with Amy "Jaws" Young, T-6A Texan II simulator instructor, at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Dec. 17, 2018. Young refers to this class as "switchology," which ingrains new pilots with the knowledge and muscle memory of each switch in the T-6 flightdeck. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

SHEPPARD AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- This week's Sheppard in photos focuses on the diversity of training that Sheppard supports. This week specifically on flight simulator training and Navy constructionman training.