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Ohio native ACEs Aerospace Propulsion course

Airman 1st Class Alexander Girardot, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course graduate, poses for a picture at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, July 18, 2019. Girardot received the ACE award after passing all nine blocks of instruction with perfect scores. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Airman 1st Class Alexander Girardot, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course graduate, poses for a picture at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, July 18, 2019. Girardot received the ACE award after passing all nine blocks of instruction with perfect scores. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Airman 1st Class Alexander Girardot, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course graduate, poses for a picture at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, July 18, 2019. Girardot received the ACE award after passing all nine blocks of instruction with perfect scores. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

Airman 1st Class Alexander Girardot, 361st Training Squadron aerospace propulsion apprentice course graduate, looks at his training objectives at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, July 18, 2019. Girardot received the ACE award after passing all nine blocks of instruction with perfect scores. The course is 72 days long. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Pedro Tenorio)

SHEPPARD AIR FORCE BASE, Texas --

As with success, making a positive impact on someone is noticeable … after a long, long and (sometimes) tortuous process. Whether working to get good grades or working to see a friend get back on their feet you most likely won't see results right away. But that's when diligence and perseverance comes in. When people see success, that's all they see. They do not see the sweat, the calloused hands, the exhausted eyes. The people see the successful people triumphantly walking out of the fires, but not the burns on their back. Getting an award like this is not easy, but Airman 1st Class Girardot enjoys the challenge, and that's why he is one of the few to ACE this course.

Girardot was awarded the ACE award after passing the Aerospace Propulsion apprentice course at Sheppard AFB, the course consists of nine blocks of instruction fit into 72 days.

 

Rank / Name: A1C Alexander N. Girardot

Unit: 361 TRS with assignment to 718th AMXS, Kadena AB Japan

Duty title: Aerospace Propulsion Apprentice

Hometown:  Dayton, Ohio

Time in Service: 6 Months

Why you joined: I wanted to do something that would be a positive impact on people’s lives.

Family: Mother: Jennifer Holbrook, Step-Father: Jeremy Holbrook, Step-Brothers’: Jacob, Caleb and Quinten Holbrook, Grandmother: Deborah Girardot, Grandfather: Jack Girardot and Great Grandmother: Jakie Stutz

Hobbies: Riding my motorcycle, trying new things, road trips, outdoor activites, video games and spending times with friends

Favorite aspect of job: The satisfaction of completing a long and difficult task.

Most memorable Air Force experience: Serving in the airman leadership program.

How do you make responsible choices: I ask myself what my grandmother would think

Instructor: Mr. Gaylon Hawkins

Question for Instructor: The turboprop apprentice course encompasses three engine systems and two propeller systems. The Rolls Royce T56-A-15 and AE2100D3 turboprop engines are used on C-130 aircraft. The General Electric T700-701C turboshaft engine is installed on the HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter. The Dowty propeller is installed on the C-130J and the Hamilton Standard propeller is installed on the C-130H aircraft.  The course is divided into nine blocks of instruction in 72 days. To ACE this course is uncommon. In my 19 years of instruction only six have achieved this honor. A1C Girardot’s strong work ethic and professionalism are key to his success. He truly reveals the standard of the total Airman.